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Archive for February, 2010

If you have not explored the world of Geocaching with kids….you are missing out on a great literacy / numeracy / cultural experience.  This is an all in one lesson folks.  All you need is curiousity, a GPS unit and a few kids and adults…and you will discover hidden treasure all over the world!  “It’s not nerdy its actually cool and you have to be smart!”

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Wisdom

We all have quotes or signatures at the bottom of our emails don’t we?  Mine is from Carl Sagan, visionary.

“For creatures as small as we the vastness is bearable only through love.”

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Clearly technology is not the sole answer to the teaching  learning gap.  It is just another channel to watch.  I view Twitter dialogue (#edchat) as a Protocol for my learning.  140 characters is concise to say the least.  A person of my loquaciousness needs boundaries.  Twitter gives me that structure.  Because it is on the public timeline I have also maintained public integrity.  I know that my digital existence is infinite.  I will be held accountable for my words.  Thus there are inherent “norms”.  My efforts are to get my colleagues to the table to discuss the issues in the same light.  I do not have a lack of faith or belief in any of us.  I know that people don’t “hate” me for talking it up.  On the contrary I understand that each of us has deep understanding for the role that education has played in our lives and we wish to provide that to our communities.  Technology is one avenue to get to that conversation outside of the time crunch and certainly outside of your circle of influence.  I have pictures of technoids sitting in rooms with handhelds engaging in Tweetups!  This is a structured protocol.

My friend’s email was included as a response because it helps me recognize the obstacles to having other educational leaders join the conversations.  I respect my friend immensely and thus view these perceptions as real concerns and obstacles for other professional educators.

  1. The time needed to learn the technology.
  2. The superficiality of the “Twitterverse”.
  3. The feeling that being self-referential is a bad thing.

1.  The technological learning curve is actually quite steep.  With the likes of WordPress, Twitter,  and other Web 2.0 applications that are web based there really is no length of time to learning these pieces of software.  There are oodles of people willing to help you once you are actually plugged in. 

2.  It is simple, only follow those people who offer something to your professional learning profile.  When they stop offering something to your professional learning profile stop following them.  Likewise you will notice that you can allow only those people you feel are following you for professional learning reasons.  Sure the web is full of stuff that just isn’t adding to the collective social consciousness of the world.  So are book stores.

3.  Delete self-referential and insert self-reflective.  T.W.I.T.T.E.R.-The World’s Intellectuals Taking Turns Exchanging Resources.  This was a Twitter post late last week by an educator I follow.  “Resources” are practical applications, web resources or could simply be the ideas, feelings, opinions and experiences that keep your mind actively assimilating new information.  Twitter provides a timeline for your self-reflection.  The self reflection you offer can stimulate others self-reflection.  It is essentially self-reflection for collective wisdom.  Please do not tell us what you had for breakfast.

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In my defense re: Twitter 
 
I am of an age where the time I need to invest in learning to use technology is overwhelming. I also have a personal bias against the inanities of the “twitterverse”. I feel we are raising a generation so introspective that they really do believe the world should care about what they had for breakfast. So much introspection breeds delusions of grandeur; this world needs more inflated egos like I need a hole in the head. I concede that situations like the Haiti earthquake were covered in the first person by Twitter and that kind of direct communication did contribute to the global action in support of the survivors, but each week, alongside the news topics, are just as many followers for pop culture like Justin Bieber or LOST. That self-referential “digital noise” really turns me off. After reading the article, I would also concede that the author feels his Twitter network keeps him motivated. As I seem to be in a bit of a rut right now, I guess I can understand that.
 
By the way, the Dec. 2009 issue of WIRED ( yes, I do read a variety of periodicals- even those on technology on occasion) had a very interesting article about Evan Ratliff who decided to shed his identity one month to see if it were possible to hide in plain sight in the digital age. For one month he travelled around the U.S. with those who were trying to find him close on his heels. They set up networks, FACEBOOK, blogs and Twitter etc. to share information; “where is Evan Ratliff?” In the end, his Twitter posts were his undoing and he was found on day 25. What connected for me was that an institution sprung up instantly to solve a problem. Members did not compete, they collaborated (Vanish Team). I found this saga to be a parable for how knowledge will be disseminated and shared in the future and what we need to prepare our students for. 
 
 

 

Wired Magazine: Where is Evan Ratliff?

Just blathering on a Sunday afternoon. I need to pay my bills electronically so I am using email as a task avoidance strategy. (<~~ yes I realize the irony of ending this with a self-referential statement).  

Cheers
Your Friend

 

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